Resize text-+=
Sunday October 24, 2021

Food: the Universal Unifier

Among  the  many  joys  of  life  lost  to  the  current  pandemic,  sharing  a  meal  is  probably  the  most  sorely  missed  by  us  all.  One  never  had  to  think  twice  before  grabbing  a  coffee  with  colleagues  or  throwing  a  weekend  party  for  friends.  It  was  so  regular  that  we  seldom  realized  the  significance  it  had  in  our  social  life,  unlike  the  French,  who  very  early  recognized  the  connection  between  social  life  and  meals.  Not  only  do  they  mark  mealtime  as  sacred,  they  strongly  believe  in  the  significance  of  eating  together,   preferably  in  good  company,  and  follow  a  strict  ritual  where  people  have  their  three  meals  at  a  fixed  time  in  the  day.  The  French  are  also  very  conscious  of  eating  habits  and  never  rush  a  meal.  

A  similar  concept  ‘potluck,’  is  prevalent  in  Cambodia,  where  villagers  congregate  to  share  food  and  strengthen  community  bonding.  One  of  the  earliest  evidence  of  sharing  meals  has  been  traced  to  the  world’s  oldest  hearth  unearthed  at  the  archaeological  site  Qesem  Cave,  in  Israel.  Believed  to  be  300,000  years  old,  it  suggests  it  was  regularly  used  by  the  people  inhabiting  the  place. 

Parisian cafe
The French never rush a meal

Food  is  something  we  all  bond  over.  Food  is  a  universal  unifier,  a  conversation  starter,  a  way  to  cherish,  love  and  remember  one  another  for  times  to  come.  Sharing  food  is  seen  as  an  expression  of  love,  trust  and  friendship.  Some  of  the  fondest  memories  for  a  family  are  forged  at  the  dinner  table  where  a  meal  goes  way  beyond  satiating  the  taste  buds  and  culling  hunger  pangs.  According  to  sociologist  and  author  Alice  Julier, of  the  book  titled,  Eating  Together:  Food,  Friendship,  and  Inequality,  when  people  invite  others  over  for  a  meal,  social  inequalities  play  out  in  ways  that  can  make  people  feel  excluded  or  included.  At  the  dining  table  the  conversation  had  over  food  among  different  genders,  races  and  social  communities  has  the  scope  to  reduce  preconceptions  and  prejudices  which  is  why  food  can  initiate  a  strong  social  community  bonding.   



Sharing  time  over  a  meal  is  so  primal  that  researchers  have  also  recommended  it  for  better  workplace  bonding.  It  certainly  then  isn’t  an  exaggeration  that  many  regard  dining  time  as  a  time  that  also  nourishes  the  soul.  Michael  Frost,  author  of  the  book  titled,  Surprise  the  World:  Fine  Habits  of  Highly  Missional  People,  who  considers  the  act  of  eating  together  as  a  way  to  uncover  inherent  humanity,  writes,  ‘We  share  stories.  And  hopes.  And  tears.  And  disappointments.  The  interaction  is  so  intense  that  people  often  shrug  of  inhibitions  and  warm  up  to  each  other.  

No  matter  which  community,  culture  or  region  one  belongs  to,  we’ve  all  personally  experienced  ways  through  which  food  brings  people  together.  Growing  up  in  an  Anglo-Indian  settlement  surrounded  by  numerous  little  villages  and  small  towns,  with  native  populace  whose  culture  was  so  diverse  from  ours  owing  to  the  different  lineage,  once  again  it  was  food  that  cut  across  all  these  boundaries,  and  unified   us  as  a  community.  Besides  the  special  occasions  like  festivals,  community  picnics  and  get-togethers  when  every  family  cooked  a  dish  and  the  residents  came  together  to  relish  it  as  a  community,  there  was  another  source  of  sharing  food  that  provided  a  reason  for  everyday  interactions.  

With  an  orchard  in  our  backyard,  the  abundance  of  harvest  was  enough  for  people  of  the  whole  locality.  Not  only  did  the  shared  produce  bring  closeness,  it  also  helped  us  to  cross  over  and  understand  the  food  habits  of  other  cultures.  For  instance,  it  was  only  after  the  locals  introduced  us  to  Indian  hog  plum  or  amra,  we  realized  the  value  of  this  fruit  which  grew  in  our  jungle.  And  the  royal  mango  has  over  the  years  fostered  many  fruitful  relationships  that  lasted  long  after  the  mango  season  got  over.  When  we  visited  friends,  we  took  a  bag  of  mangoes  along.  Sometimes  the  principal  of  our  school  would  drive  down  to  our  place  to  feast  on  the  flavours  of  the  seasons.  Our  neighbour  across  the  street,  renowned  for  her  baking  skills,  was  mad  over  mangoes. In  appreciation  for  a  bag  of  juicy  Langda  or  Dasheri  she  would  bake  a  scrumptious  cake  with  mango  frosting  for  us,  or  make  a  delicious  mango  pudding.  

Indian food eating together sharing a meal
During community picnics and get-togethers every family cooked soething

With  an  orchard  in  our  backyard,  the  abundance  of  harvest  was  enough  for  people  of  the  whole  locality.  Not  only  did  the  shared  produce  bring  closeness,  it  also  helped  us  to  cross  over  and  understand  the  food  habits  of  other  cultures.  For  instance,  it  was  only  after  the  locals  introduced  us  to  Indian  hog  plum  or  amra,  we  realized  the  value  of  this  fruit  which  grew  in  our  jungle.  And  the  royal  mango  has  over  the  years  fostered  many  fruitful  relationships  that  lasted  long  after  the  mango  season  got  over.  When  we  visited  friends,  we  took  a  bag  of  mangoes  along.  Sometimes  the  principal  of  our  school  would  drive  down  to  our  place  to  feast  on  the  flavours  of  the  seasons.  Our  neighbour  across  the  street,  renowned  for  her  baking  skills,  was  mad  over  mangoes. In  appreciation  for  a  bag  of  juicy  Langda  or  Dasheri  she  would  bake  a  scrumptious  cake  with  mango  frosting  for  us,  or  make  a  delicious  mango  pudding.  

Evidence  that  our  ancestors  were  fastidious  about  preparing  authentic  meals  and  preserving  recipes  is  reflected  in  the  habit  families  showed  to  fiercely  guard  recipe  secrets  like  precious  heirloom,  to  only  pass  them  down  to  their  next  generations.  To  the  extent  that  if  a  recipe was  popular  and  someone  wanted  to  replicate  it,  it  wasn’t  uncommon  for  them  to  exclude  a  few  ingredients  from  the  original  before  sharing.  That’s  how  in  the  days  of  yore  grandmas  retained  their  monopoly  over  certain  traditional  meals.  Much  similar  to  the  trade  secret  of  the  fast  food  chains  and  cola  companies  that  are  worth  billions  today.   

It  might  appear  easy  to  share  personal  stories  about  food  and  you  don’t  need  to  be  a  food  historian  or  a  culinary  expert  for  that,  but  it  also  depends  entirely  on  who  you’re  trying  to  woo.  Soon  after  my  marriage  into  a  Bengali  family,  a  community  that  prides  themselves  for   being  foodies,  I  realized  food  wasn’t  only  a  conversation  starter,  it  was  the  entire  conversation.  Needless  to  say,  I  found  myself  at  sea  when  it  came  to  both,  speaking  Bengali,  and  talking about their  cuisine.  But  thankfully  the  ingredients  were  the  same  and  while  we  might  not  have  had  a  common  dish  to  bond  over,  using  the  same  handful  of  ingredients,   mom-in-law  and  I  would  take  turns  to  churn  out  dishes  from  our  respective  communities.  

Looking  back,  I  can  only  smile  at  how  our  food  diversity  became  the  bridge  to  a  lifetime  of  food  stories  shared  at  the  dining  table,  their  memories,  like  wafts  of  a  fine  meal,  linger  on.  

Images courtesy: Pxhere, Wikiedia Commons

Tags

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER

Multimedia

Member Login

Submit Your Content