Resize text-+=
Tuesday June 28, 2022

Time for Digital Detox!

digital detox

We  are  living  in  times  when  there  is  no  dearth  of  distressing  news.  A  war  is  raging.  For  over  two  years  now  the  coronavirus  pandemic  continues  to  test  our  resilience.  And  yesterday,  I  read  a  report  about  how  record  rise  in  temperature  at  both  of  Earth’s  poles  could  be  catastrophic  for  all  living  things.  The  influx  of  bad  news  doesn’t  cease,  but  our  capacity  to  consume  and  process  it  has  a  certain  threshold.  After  we  cross  that  limit,  it  becomes  overwhelming.  Earlier,  switching  off  the  television  news  or  folding  up  the  newspaper  brought  temporary  respite  from  these   stressors. However, now,  being  constantly  plugged  in  through  devices  we  carry  on  ourselves,  wherever  we  go,  we  cannot  get  away  from  troubling  news.  

The  relentless  use  of  devices  also  messes  with  our  overall  health,  beginning  with  disrupting  our  natural  sleep  cycle.  According  to  Harvard  researchers  the  environmentally  friendly  blue  wavelengths  from  the  screen  of  phones,  computers  and  tablets  known  to  boost  mood  and  attention,  along  with  being  easy  on  the  eyes,   can  adversely  affect  sleep  by  disrupting  the  circadian  rhythm   or  the  human’s  biological  clock.  Prolonged  use  of  devices  have  long  been  associated  with  problems  related  to  vision,  neck  pain  and  overall  well being.   

digital detox
Research shows negative social medial experience can affect our mental health.

Social  media  is  another  area  which  is  testing  human  sanity.   Although  an  integral  part  of  our  daily  existence,  research  shows  negative  social  medial  experience  can  affect  our  mental  health.  An  annual  survey  to  assess  stress  levels  in  their  population  by  the  American  Psychological  Association  found  18  percent  adults  citing  tech  stress  to  be  a  major  reason  for  their  stress,  with  use  of  social  media  and  constant  checking  of  texts  and  emails  being  the  problem.  Also  multiple  studies  have  established  that  spending  hours  scrolling  through  content  that  is  provocative  and  upsetting,  makes  one  feel  anguished,  depressed  and  drained.   The  only  viable  way  then  to  clear  the  mind  is  by  taking  a  break  from  these  devices  or  a  digital  detox!  

While  it  might  sound  like  a  cool  thing  to  go  on  a  ‘digital  detox,’  and  there  are  studies  that  show  a  break  from  devices  have  multiple  health  benefits,  it  still  needs   to  be  planned.  Be  realistic  when  setting  your  target  of  how  long  to  abstain  from  devices.  For  some,  complete  disconnection  might  be  possible,  but  you  might  need  to  stay  connected  for  work  commitments.  In  that  case, missing  important  messages  and  emails  might  lead  to  more  stress  than  respite. But  there’s  a  way  around  this  too.  Start  by  going  off  your  device  for  a  few  hours,  the  evening,  a   day  or  weekend.  Exempt  checking  work-related  emails  from  the  plan. Delete  social  media  apps  to  avoid  getting  tempted  when  you  take  up  your  phone  for  work  purposes.  This  also  helps  to  reinforce  the  fact  that  a  short  break  from  these  apps  will  not  kill  you  and  gives  you  confidence  to  take  longer  breaks  in  the  future.  

loneliness
Is it loneliness that makes you seek out virtual company?

Catherine  Price,  author  of  the  book  titled  How  to  Break  Up  with  Your  Phone  :  The  30-Day  Plan  to  Take  Back  Your  Life,  in  an  article  published  by  Good  Housekeeping  believes  that  staying  plugged  in  isn’t  a  problem  until  it  begins  to  have  a  negative  impact  on  your  mental  wellness,  creativity  and  productivity  and  hampers  activities  that  add  up  to  your  overall  happiness.  She  goes  on  to  suggest  that  an  evaluation  of  your  social  media  habits  will  point  you  to  where  the  problem  lies.  It’s  a  great  way  to  determine  whether  your  screen  time  is  cutting  into  valuable  time  you  would  otherwise  spend  on  hobbies  or  socialising  in  the  real  world.  Or  if  loneliness  makes  you  reach  for  the  phone  to  seek  out  virtual  company.   And  if  you’re  guilty  of  checking  your  phone  mid-conversations.  Along  with taking  a  break  from  your  device,  you  might  need  to  correct  other  aspects  of  your  life  as  well.

An  annual  survey  to  assess  stress  levels  in  their  population  by  the  American  Psychological  Association  found  18  percent  adults  citing  tech  stress  to  be  a  major  reason  for  their  stress,  with  use  of  social  media  and  constant  checking  of  texts  and  emails  being  the  problem.  Also  multiple  studies  have  established  that  spending  hours  scrolling  through  content  that  is  provocative  and  upsetting,  makes  one  feel  anguished,  depressed  and  drained.  

Limiting  the  use  of  devices  is  another  way  to  take  brief  breaks  and  refresh  the  mind.  To  limit  your  use  of  screen  time, pinpoint  the  apps  that  you  find  that take  up  most  of  your  time  and  delete  or  avoid  it.   Set  your  phone  aside  when  you  eat  meals,  socialise  and  spend  time  with  family.  Turn  off  options  of  push  notifications  and  message  alerts.   Next  time  you  find  yourself  reaching  for  a  device  to  fill  your  spare  time,   imagine  you’re  living  in  an  era  when  these  devices  were  not  available  and  go  back  to  doing  exciting  things  that  people  did  in  times  of  yore.  Learn  to  entertain  yourself   by  taking  up  a  hobby,  cooking  a  meal,  doing  physical  exercise  or  spending  that  time  with  family.  When  you  feel  the  need  to  connect  with  people,  go  outside  and  socialise.   If  you  still  find  it  a  challenge  to  keep  your  hands  off  your  devices,  rope  in  a  friend  or  family  members  to  join  you.    

Another  effective  way  to  cut  out  the  stress  of  your  social  media  is  by  improving  your  virtual  interactions  and  customising  your  feed.  Curate  your  social  media  content  to  not  only  eliminate  stress,  but  to  help  you  get  more  value  out  of  your  experience.  We  often  forget  that  we  choose  what  appears  on  our  timeline  and  who  we  connect  with.  Make  the  most  of  filters,  block  and  other  options  available.  Cut  down  the  content  that  triggers  you.   Mute  or  block  accounts  that  make  you  question  your  life  choices  or  lead  to  you  being  dissatisfied  with  yourself.  Stop  interacting  with  people  who  are  insensitive  and  lack  empathy.  Don’t  respond  to  provocative  messages  and  steer  far  from  trolls.  Instead  of  using  it  as  a  platform  to  debate  with  people,  ensure  your  use  of  social  media  is  purposeful  like  for  promoting  your  brand  or  business  and  for  networking.  

Remember,  the  purpose  of  technology  and  devices   is  to  make  our  life  easier  and  not  add  to  our  problems. Let’s  keep  it  that  way!   

Tags

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER

Multimedia

Member Login

Submit Your Content