Resize text-+=
Wednesday June 29, 2022

Homecoming

McCluskiegunj

The  new  year  might  be  about  new  beginnings,  but  it’s  also  about  staying  connected  with  the  past,  especially  ones  roots,  and  two  decades  ago  I  took  a  path  hoping  for  an  exciting  new  journey  when  I  uprooted  myself  from  my  hometown  McCluskiegunj,  and  chose  the  city  of  Calcutta  to  settled  down.  Like  it  is  with  most  of  us,  distance  does  make  the  heart  grow  fonder.  And  ever  since  I  stepped  out  of  that  idyllic  countryside  which  happens  to  be  every  city-dweller’s  fantasy,  the  connection  has  only  grown  more  profound. 

McCluskiegunj Jharkhand
Many of the old homes in the Gunj. Image courtesy: Lesley D Biswas.

For  ages  the   Gunj,  the  name  we  call  our  hometown,  has  inspired  creative  minds.  Author  Vikas  Kumar  Jha’s  book  titled  McCluskiegunj  is  set  here.  The  place is also  found  mentioned  in  After  The  Raj:  The  Last  Stayers-On  And  The  Legacy  Of  British  India  by  Hugh  Purcell  and  in  the  writings  of  eminent  Bengali  author  Budhadeb  Guha,  who  smitten  by  the  hamlet  bought  a  beautiful  colonial  style  bungalow  here.  The  Gunj  also  worked  its  charm  on  actress  and  filmmaker  Aparna  Sen,  who  too  once  owned  a  bungalow  here,  where  Konkona  Sen  Sharma  often  visited  as  a  child.  It  was  only  fitting  that  years  later,  in  2017,  Sharma’s  directorial  debut  A  Death  in  the  Gunj  was  filmed  in  McCluskiegunj.  The  movie  once  more  generated  hype  around  this  forlorn  Anglo-Indian  settlement  which  happened  to  be  christened  ‘Mini  London’  by  tourists  for  their  similarities,  but  for  us  residents,  the  story  was  slightly  different.  

And  I  imagine  it’s  the  bane  of  every  local  living  in  a  touristy  place,  who  despite  all  the  buzz  around  their  hometown,  find  it  lackluster.  For  instance, I  found  it  hard  to  share  the  tourists’ verve  and  see  novelty  in  familiar  sights  I  saw  daily  even  if  they  were  breathtakingly  beautiful.  It  was  especially  implausible to  see  the  prettiness  in  the  pitch  dark  nights,  a  result  of  prolonged  power  cuts  which  made  the  stars  overhead  appear  a  tad  brighter  and  jackal  howls  from  the  jungle  behind  our  home,  sound  closer.  At  eventide,  while  tourists  enjoyed  a  glass  of  homemade  mulberry  or  ginger  wine  seated  around  the  bonfire  soaking  in  the  sound  of  the  surrounds – forests  and  hills  replete  with  the  trill  of  birds  and  insects,  I  wondered  when  I  would  break  away  from  the  monotony.    

For  ages  the   Gunj,  the  name  we  call  our  hometown,  has  inspired  creative  minds.  Author  Vikas  Kumar  Jha’s  book  titled  McCluskiegunj  is  set  here. 

To  my  cousins  who  lived  in  the  city  and  visited  on  vacations,  I  appeared  to  be  living  the  carefree  childhood  like  the  children  in  one  of  Enid  Blyton’s  adventures,  except  that  I  felt  trapped.  So  while  they  would  get  busy  planning  picnics  to  mosquito  infested  woods  or  talk  about  following  secret  treasures-trail  to  hidden  caves  in  the  hills,  I  would  gently  veer  our  conversation  to  things  that  I  could  only  dream  of,  like  visiting  theme  parks,  movie  theatres  or  going  to  a  stadium  to  watch  a  cricket  match.  

I  would  also  often  compare  my  hometown  to  other  tourist  destinations,  but  alas  it  never  matched  up.  There  were  no  immaculate  well-laid  gardens  to  stroll  about.  Ours  was  a  messy  expanse  where  wildflowers,  bougainvillea  and  rambling  roses  grew  in  abandon  and  you  could  easily  trip  over  one  of  the  coral  vine  creepers  that  wantoned  across  the  garden  pathway  or  a  dirt  road.  Instead  of  the  streets  flanked  by  shops  selling  souvenirs’, here  grew  lantana  bushes  and  sal  trees.  Neither  were  there  any  sort  of  landmarks  worth  a  mention.  In  place  of  ruins  of  famous  forts  or  tombs,  we  had  the  remnants  of  old,  crumbling  colonial  style  bungalows  that  many  an  Anglo  Indian  family  had  abandoned  when  they  left  for  greener  pastures,  their  untold  stories  waiting  for  a  patient  listener.  

If  there  ever  was  a  single  stone  of  historic  value,  it  was  the  fountain  which  marked  the  establishment  of  McCluskiegunj  in  1933,  when  its  founder,  a  Calcutta  businessman  E.T. McCluskie  acquired  an  expansive  10,000  acres  of  beauteous  countryside  from  the  Ratu  Raja  to  settle  as  few  as  300  Anglo-Indian  families,  like  himself.  Today,  from  the  perspective  of  a  city-dweller,  the  sight  of  boundless  open  space,  houses  whose  compounds  comprise their  own  private  jungles  teaming  with  wildlife,  makes  me  breathless.  

How  ironic  that  back  then,   I  had  felt  claustrophobic!   

McCluskiegunj
The serene greenery that surrounds The Gunj. Image courtesy: Lesley D Biswas.

To  be  fair  to  myself,  age  was  an  important  factor.  Point  me  to  one  young  person  who’s  bewitched  by  twinkling  stars,  howling  jackals  and  birdsongs!  And  so,  no  matter  how  much  I  wanted  to,  I  could  never  be  like  the  disconnected  tourist,  to  be  able  to  see  my  hometown  anew.  And  to  appreciate  its  serenity  and  burst  into  a  song  like  Mrs  Dasgupta   had  done  years  ago,  plucking  a  bright  red  hibiscus  and  sticking  it  behind  her  ear,  as  she  hummed  a  Rabindra  Sangeet  number – I  had  to  detach  myself  from  the  Gunj  and  become  an  occasional  visitor  myself.    

Ours  was  a  messy  expanse  where  wildflowers,  bougainvillea  and  rambling  roses  grew  in  abandon  and  you  could  easily  trip  over  one  of  the  coral  vine  creepers  that  wantoned  across  the  garden  pathway  or  a  dirt  road.

Some  time  back  I  received  a  link  to  an  archived  article  on  my  hometown.  Like  it’s  with  all  old,  paled  photos,  a  surge  of  nostalgia  coursed  through  me  and  a  lump  formed  in  my  throat  as  I  realized  only a few  people  in  those  photos  were  still  around.  Among  those  familiar  faces  lost  forever  are  some  who  had  smiled  back  at  me  when  we  crossed paths  on  walks.  One  who  has  settled  in  a  foreign  land  will  know  the  meaning  of  sighting  a  familiar  face  in  a  crowd  of  strangers!  It  isn’t  the  place,  but  those  faces  that  make  up  our  hometown.  

If  the  pandemic  gave  us  one  life  lesson,  it’s  to  live  in  the  moment  and  to  value  time.  There  might  never  be  another  time  to  appreciate  life  and  those  we  love.  As  I  begin  a  new  year  in  this  city  I  now  call  home,  I’m  conscious  of  appreciating  what  this  place  has  to  offer  me  and  those  I  live  among.  I  hope  when  the  time  comes  to  look  back,  like  it  will  come  in  all  our  lives  when  we  choose  to  reflect  upon  our  journeys,  that  trip  down  memory  lane  will  have  more  fond  memories  than  regrets  to  warm  the  cockles  of  my  heart!

Tags

One Response

  1. I had been to Gunj a few years back. Was always fascinated by the stories I heard about the place. The two day stay was memorBle

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER

Multimedia

Member Login

Submit Your Content