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Tuesday May 17, 2022

Diaspora

springtime memories
Diaspora

Mumma’s Bindis (VI)

Spring is finally here! Time to get the deck furniture out, fill up the birdfeeder, run outside to catch the dandelions and smell the fresh air. As Didi was helping Mumma clean the deck chairs, Ujaan poured yellow, white, and brown seeds into the birdfeeder with his little hands.

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happiness and sadness
Diaspora

Mumma’s Bindis (V)

Just like happiness, sadness is also a part of your life, Mumma tells them. So every night Ujaan and Didi tell Mumma their happy part and sad part of the day. One of each kind. Ujaan likes to talk about the happy part first, because most days he doesn’t have a sad part.

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mumma's bindis episode iv
Diaspora

Mumma’s Bindis (IV)

Their party of nine was quite an interesting bunch. Didan was the eldest member of the team. She was eighty-one, and Ujaan the youngest member barely “onety-one”!

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Mumma's Bindi 3-It's Christmas Eve!
Diaspora

Mumma’s Bindis (III)

Urja and Ujaan are on a baking spree this afternoon with Mumma, sifting the flour, beating the egg yolks, pouring in ladles of oil, and mixing in all sorts of goodies in the form of ripe red strawberries, almond slivers, chocolate chips, and cranberries for a sweet and tangy taste.

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What's in a Dot?
Diaspora

Mumma’s Bindis (II)

This evening, Didi put phnota on his forehead three times. Ujaan sat in his ashan, next to the ashan on which Mumma’s laptop sat with skype open for the brother who is away.

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21 February International Mother Language Day
Diaspora

A Love so Strong

I wish I knew all the languages in this world. I could know so many human stories, literature, lyrics, and folklores told in their own manner and not a translated one.

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immigrants arriving in the USA
Diaspora

Nineteenth Century Emigrants of India to the US (I)

The silk items these Bengali “peddlers” brought with them to sell to Americans were called chikons or chikans, and the traders became known as chikondars or chikandars. The American elite at that time were enthralled by all things Oriental and found such “exotic” items hard to resist.

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