Resize text-+=
Wednesday June 29, 2022

Nature’s Whispers

nature image courtesy https://oecd-environment-focus.blog

Nature  has  a  theory.  It’s  one  that  Mowgli  alludes  to  in  The  Jungle  Book  – “The  forest  speaks  to  me  because  I  know  how  to  listen.” 

In  a  world  so  fraught  with  pandemonium,  stress  and  now  the  uncertainties  of  a  raging  pandemic,  the  mind  is  in  perpetual  turmoil.  If  there’s  a  way  to  restore  some  semblance  to  the  weary  soul  and  calm  the  restless  mind,  it’s  through  tranquil  silence.  Ephemeral  silence  too  can  be  a  blessing  for  those  living  in  urban  spaces  where  noise  overrides  everything  and  it  wouldn’t  be  an  exaggeration  that  connecting  with  nature  appears  to  be  the  immediate  remedy  to  many  urban  maladies  of  this  century.  

But  nature  is  never  completely  silent,  or  as  we  literally  mean,  devoid  of  any  sound.   The  natural  world  is  alive  and  pulsating  with  its  daily  business  of  surviving.  The  creatures  in  the  oceans,  the  swish  of  their  tails,  the  snapping  shrimps  and  the  crashing  waves  as  they   break  on  the  surface  of  the  pristine  water,  send  a  ripple  through  the  senses.  On  a  walk  through  the  forest  the  sound  of  the  wind  through  the  leaves,  the  undergrowth  abuzz,  reverberating  with  countless  insects,  frogs  calling  and  gurgling  streams  are  bound  to  trickle  into  the  ear.  Even   birdsong – the  impressive  courtship  and  mating  theatrics  as  birds  flutter  their  wings  and  dance,  or  a  species  mimicry  to  survive  a  predator.  These  are  natural,  rhythmic  sounds  that  can  be  heard  all  the  time.  The  only  difference  is  these  aren’t  man-made  and  they  aren’t  disturbing.  

jungle  safaris  whose   purpose  is  to  allow  visitors  to  connect  with  nature,  and  get  close  to  photograph  wildlife,  have  become  a  haunting  time  for  the  resident  wild.  

Nature’s  silence,  is  in  fact  a  symphony  of  these  pleasant,  tranquil  sounds  that  are  positively  elevating.  Alternatively  referred  to  as  ‘nature’s  song’  these  natural  sounds  can  only  be  heard  when  the  mind  is  still  and  the  soul,  calm  and   awake.   In  natural  surrounds  like  forests,  on  nature  trails,  in  a  park,  at  the  reef,  atop  mountains,  a  little  still  and  quiet  allows  nature  to  come  into  its  own.  The  Japanese  for  instance  regard  the  sounds  and  scents  of  the  forest  to  be  a  source  of  healing  and  comfort.  Shinrin-yoku  or  the  practice  of  forest  bathing  is  a  Japanese  concept  of  embracing  the  sights,  sounds  and  smell  of  the  forest.  This  can  be  experienced  on   hikes  and  walks  or  simply  spending  time  among  the  trees,  absorbing  the  surrounds  through  all  the  senses.  

But  as  the  need  to  celebrate  nature  and  imbibe  its  silence  grows  more  urgent,  human  interaction  with  nature  had  begun  to  deplete  this  very  reservoir  that  they  seek  so  ardently.  

shinrin-yoku
Shinrin-yoku or nature bathing. Image courtesy dg2design.com

Nature   photography  is  a  rapidly  growing  activity  among  the  urban  folk  who  find  it  an  easy  and  affordable  way  to  experience  nature’s  beauty  and  imbue  its  silence.  When  captured  ethically  nature  photography  is  a  powerful  tool  to  inspire  the  youth  to  conserve  nature.  But  what  might  seem  like  a  harmless  hobby,  photographers  sifting  through  the  wild,  their  sophisticated  equipment  slung  across  their  shoulders  and  binoculars  dangling  from  the  neck –  if  you  look  from  nature’s  perspective,  especially  during  bird  nesting  season  when  birds  require  uninterrupted  privacy,  photographing  birds  and  peeking  into  their  nests  to  click  their  fledglings,  is  an  invasion  of  the  subject’s  space  and  welfare.  This  often  leads  to  birds  abandoning  nests  and  fledglings.  

Likewise  jungle  safaris  whose   purpose  is  to  allow  visitors  to  connect  with  nature,  and  get  close  to  photograph  wildlife,  have  become  a  haunting  time  for  the  resident  wild.   When  interacting  with  nature  the  basic  rule  is  to  respect  the  quiet  natural  world  without  altering  or  disturbing  its  order,  whatever  maybe  underway,  whether   it’s  hunting,  resting  or  breeding  rituals.  At  no  cost  the  comfort  of  the  subject  should  be  compromised. Nature  photography  calls  for  compassion  of  the  subject  and  understating  of  the  surrounding  natural  landscape. 

The  creatures  in  the  oceans,  the  swish  of  their  tails,  the  snapping  shrimps  and  the  crashing  waves  as  they   break  on  the  surface  of  the  pristine  water,  send  a  ripple  through  the  senses. 

Among  the  many  ways  to  experience  silence  in  our  lives,  be  it  through  the  conscious  toning  down  of  our  breathless  lifestyle,  the  practice  of  mindfulness  or  meditation – nature’s  silence  alone  restores  mental  and  physical  balance  like  none  other.  But  far  away  from  these  natural  surrounds  where  most  of  humanity  is  cooped  up  today,  the  only  possible  way  to  experience  its  ethereal  silence  is  to  siphon  it  out  from  the   surrounding  noise.  

You  might  be  fortunate  if  your  upbringing  gives  you  the  inherent  understanding  how  to  do  this.  A  discriminating  ear  of  a  nature  lover  that  can  listen  and  ascertain  nature’s  silence  amid  the  din.  But  it’s  also  possible  to  learn,  and  like  the Buddhist  use  breath  as  an  object  of  awareness  to  focus  their  mind  on  and  meditate,  all  you  need  is  to  focus  on  a  particular  natural  sound.  Once  your  senses  get  attuned,  you  will  be  able  to  listen  into  nature’s  nonchalant  whispers.  The  wispy  silence  of  the  morn,  before  dawn,  and  the  midnight  stillness  can  be  harnessed  daily  and  become  your   personal  tranquil  reservoir  where  you  dip  in  during  the  noisiest  hours  of  the  day  when  your  nerves  fray  and  mind  goes  awry. 

Tags

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER

Multimedia

Member Login

Submit Your Content