Resize text-+=
Wednesday June 29, 2022

Freedom to Fall

Nature  is  the  greatest  teacher  and  the  season  of  fall  has  a  life  lesson  for  all,  especially  us  parents.  Just  like  trees  shed  their  leaves  in  order  to  survive  the  harsh,  testing  winters,  in  the  same  manner  when  children  fall  short  of  their  expectations,  it’s  only  a  temporary  setback.  Failure  isn’t  the  end,  but  a  chance  to  slow  down,  reflect  and  prepare,  and  like  trees  that  regenerate  once  again  in  spring,  when  the  conditions  are  favourable,  children  too  shall  bounce  back  and  bloom  to  their  full  potential  when  the  time  is  right.   

As  parents  we  often  feel  compelled   to  make  our  children  successful.  But  we  could  do  more  service  to  them  by  eliminating  not  failure,  but  the  fear  of  failure  from  our  children’s  lives.   

After  the  birth  of  a  child,  parents  themselves  take  baby  steps  into  parenthood  much  like  toddlers  do – unsure  and  hesitant.  Our  first  instinct  as  parents  is  to  be  protective  of  our  child.  We  want  to  be  there  for  them  whenever  they  need  us.  But  this  is  impossible  in  reality.  We  cannot  cry  their  tears  or  bear  their  failures.  And  while  children  gradually  outgrow  the  need  to  be  constantly  supervised,  parents  often  find  it  difficult  to  set  them  free  into  the  competitive  world.  But  we  must,  and  all  that  we  can  do  to  ease  them  into  this  ruthless  world  is  make  them  resilient.  

Our  response  can  raise  our  child  up  or  tear  their  fragile  self-esteem  to  shreds.  If  our  child  senses  they  let  us  down  by  failing,  they  feel  responsible  for  our  pain  and  disappointment. 

Instead  of  removing  the  obstacles  from  the  child’s  path  so  their  journey  is  smooth  and  without  hurdles,  Jessica  Lahey,  the  author  of  The  Gift  of  Failure:  How  the  Best  parents  Learn  to  Let  Go  So  Their  Children  Can  Succeed,  warns  in  her  book  that  over-protective  parents  make  children  incapable  to  cope  with  real  life  problems,  failure  being  one.  Children  then  feel  utterly  incompetent  and  unprepared  for  the  real  world  and  their  confidence  takes  a  beating.   She  suggests  allowing  children  to  overcome  the  challenge  to  make  them  more  competent  and  gain  resilience.  

In  the  process,  they  might  fall,  but  forgo  the  alacrity  to  rescue  them.  It’s  important  to  understand  that  the  very  notion  of  failure  is  askew.  Most  people  consider  failure  as  humiliating.  But  failing  is  inevitable  and  the  most  human  and  grounding  experience  we  all  undergo  sometime  in  our  lifetime.  The  great  sportsman  Michael  Jordan  put  this  into  perspective  when  he  said,  “I’ve  missed  more  than  9,000  shots  in  my  career.  I’ve  lost  almost  300  games.  Twenty-six  times  I’ve  been  trusted  to  take  the  game-winning  shot  and  missed.  I’ve  failed  over  and  over  and  over  again  in  my  life.  And  that  is  why  I  succeed.”  

Children  will  fail  when  they  try  new  things.  If  we  or  our  behaviour  discourage  them  from  undertaking  challenges  that  come  with  inherent  risks  of  failing,  we  are  doing  a  huge  disservice  to  their  emotional  and  psychological  development  by  eliminating  the  exciting  potential  for  growth  and  a  chance  to  assess  strengths  and  weaknesses  and  learn  coping  mechanisms.  Children  who  are  in  the  habit  of  succeeding  always  will  find  themselves  ill-equipped  and  anxious  when  the  inevitable  happens.  

It’s  how  we  as  their  parents  react  to  our  children’s  failing  that  makes  or  breaks  the  child’s  confidence,  not  the  event  of  failing.  Our  response  can  raise  our  child  up  or  tear  their  fragile  self-esteem  to  shreds.  If  our  child  senses  they  let  us  down  by  failing,  they  feel  responsible  for  our  pain  and  disappointment.  In  that  case  we’re  putting  a  lot  of  burden  on  our  child  to  keep  us  happy.  Imagine  how  terrible  we  can  make  them  feel  when  we  sulk  upon  their  setbacks.  But  if  we  share  an  instance  when  we  failed  too  during  our  formative  years,  and  how  we  coped,  we  make  them  realise  it  happens  to  everyone,  and  setbacks  are  a  natural  part  of  growing  up,  nothing  to  be  ashamed  off.  

In  the  process,  they  might  fall,  but  forgo  the  alacrity  to  rescue  them.  It’s  important  to  understand  that  the  very  notion  of  failure  is  askew.

As  children  grow  older  and  their  decision  making  abilities  are  put  to  the  test,  they  risk  failing  even  more  frequently,  and   need  encouragement  and  reassurance  to  build  their  self-confidence.  Whether  your  child  is  ready  to  be  empowered  to  make  their  own  decisions  will  depend  entirely  on  your  child’s  judgement  abilities  and  their  childhood  grooming.  It’s  best  to  begin  when  children  are  small,  by  allowing  them  to  make  decisions  with  minimal  risk,  like  choosing  an  outfit  to  a  party  or  who  they  want  to  befriend.  Here,  even  if  they  falter,  the  consequences  aren’t  life  altering  and  won’t  compromise  their  safety.  

With  the  drill  done,  when  they  get  older  they’re  more  proficient  in  decision  making  and  less  likely  to  fail.  But  adolescents  who  are  prone  to  risky  behaviour  by  default  are  at  a  stage  when  decisions  could  change  the  entire  course  of  their  life,  need  to  know  that  wrong  decisions  could  lead  to  undesirable  consequences  and  that  the  onus  lies  with  the  decision-maker.  Failing  hits  teens  much  harder,  and  they  take  longer  to  bounce  back.  Especially  when  it  involves  heartbreak  and  lifestyle  choices.  But  research  shows  that  when  teens  were  made  aware  of  the  risks  involved,  they  were  more  likely  to  make  better  choices. 

Our  wealth  of  knowledge   gained  from  our  own  journey  through  life,  makes  us  befit  to  be  the  best  guide  to  our  child,  and  our  role  as  parents  must  pertain  to  being   just  that,  ‘their  guide’.   And  just  like  in  fall  when  the  trees  keep  the  faith,  and  wait  patiently  for  next  spring  to  come,  we  too  need  to  stand  by  our  children  in  the  fall  of  their  life,  encouraging  and  trusting  for  their  time  to  arrive. 

Tags

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER

Multimedia

Member Login

Submit Your Content