Two Poems by Dorothy Parker

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Two poems by Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker, American poet, critic and satirist, was born on 22 August, 1893. Her first poem appeared in ‘Vanity Fair’ in 1914. Shortly thereafter, she became a fairly regular contributor at ‘Vogue’ magazine, writing poems and theatre criticism. Thespace.ink has chosen two poems by Dorothy Parker as a birthday tribute to the great social commentator. 

A Fairly Sad Tale

I think that I shall never know

Why I am thus, and I am so.
Around me, other girls inspire

In men the rush and roar of fire,

The sweet transparency of glass,

The tenderness of April grass,
The durability of granite;
But me- I don’t know how to plan it.
The lads I’ve met in Cupid’s deadlock
Were- shall we say?- born out of wedlock.
They broke my heart, they stilled my song,
And said they had to run along,
Explaining, so to sop my tears,
First came their parents or careers.
But ever does experience
Deny me wisdom, calm, and sense!
Though she’s a fool who seeks to capture
The twenty-first fine, careless rapture,
I must go on, till ends my rope,
Who from my birth was cursed with hope.
A heart in half is chaste, archaic;
But mine resembles a mosaic-
The thing’s become ridiculous!
Why am I so? Why am I thus?

Afternoon

When I am old, and comforted,
And done with this desire,
With Memory to share my bed
And Peace to share my fire,

 

I’ll comb my hair in scalloped bands
Beneath my laundered cap,
And watch my cool and fragile hands
Lie light upon my lap.

 

And I will have a sprigged gown
With lace to kiss my throat;
I’ll draw my curtain to the town,
And hum a purring note.

 

And I’ll forget the way of tears,
And rock, and stir my tea.
But oh, I wish those blessed years
Were further than they be!

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